INTRO PARTS
SETS
Moubal
Jumbo
MANUALS
Moubal
Jumbo
MARKETING PRICE LISTS
BUILDING
MOUBAL

RELATED



MARKETING - INDEX


MOUBAL PERIOD (1924 - 1951):

1924  Mobaco display card
1925  Mobaco art deco poster
1925-03-11  Utrechts Nieuwsblad article - Mobaco at the 1925 Jaarbeurs Trade Fair
1927-09-09  Utrechts Nieuwsblad article - Mobaco at the 1927 Jaarbeurs Trade Fair
1931-09-12  Zeister Courant article - Mobaco and other Moubal products at the 1931 Jaarbeurs Fall Fair
1931-09-17 Utrechts Nieuwsblad article - Mobaco at the 1931 Jaarbeurs Fall Fair
The gnomes sales brochure (Het Kabouterboekje)
      - Version 1, with Set Z (probably 1931)
               English version
               German version
      - Version 2, with Set 000 (probably 1932)
      - Version 3, with square windows (probably 1933)
Ads for Mobaco demonstrations
Unpriced ads - Moubal period (1924 - 1951)
Van den Bosch, Zeist
Bosch-Honig, Utrecht

JUMBO PERIOD (1949 - 1961)

Jumbo Toy catalogs
1966 Hausemann & Hötte display at the Jaarbeurs Trade Fair
Unpriced ads - Jumbo period (1949-1961)




MARKETING IN THE MOUBAL PERIOD (1924 - 1951)


It appears that marketing of Mobaco was primarily through retail stores. They handed out colorful price lists to prospective customers, organized "demonstrations", and placed ads in local newspapers.

In addition, Mobaco was on display at some of the Jaarbeurs trade fairs in Utrecht, which were attended by many people. Newspaper accounts indicate there were Mobaco displays at the fair in 1925, 1927 and 1931.

The first real brochure was a colorful 12-page booklet, commonly referred to as the Gnomes Book, from 1931. More about that below

Here all marketing material that has been found so far. For the Price lists and other marketing materials that mention prices, see the Price Lists page.



THE 1930-1931 REFRESH

1930 and/or 1931 seems to have been a special year, in which a number of changes were made, essentially re-branding Mobaco from an instructive architectural construction system to a fun toy.

The refresh affected all aspects of Mobaco, specifically:

  • new boxes with brighter, glossy embossed paper
  • new large cursive silver or gold logo
  • new colorful illustrated table of contents on the inside of the box lid
  • cardboard parts with brighter colors (green and red)
  • "modern" windows, with square upper openings instead of round
  • parts 60 and 62 (floor boards) finally numbered
  • new instruction manuals with colorful gnomes on the cover, including a new massive 74-page manual for Sets 1-4
  • revamped instructions with larger perspectives and smaller floor plans, emphasizing the end-product rather than the assembly
  • new colorful, child-oriented "gnomes" sales brochure (see further below)
  • ideas for eight new parts (none of which were taken into production)
  • idea for a Set 5 and a Set Z (neither of which were ultimately issued)
  • a new make-up Set 2a, which now offers a path to Set 3 starting with Set 0 (by adding Sets 0a, 1a and 2a)
  • new logo with rounded letters and "fat" O's, used on Moubal price lists through 1951, and used as logo by Jumbo. The oldest known example of this logo is a British newspaper ad from late 1930:

The article in Natuur en Techniek from 1931 may also have been part of this new push. And in the next year, Moubal brought out Set 000 in a totally different type of box, with a much simpler and cheaper construction.








1924 - MOBACO DISPLAY CARD        

 
This display card is identical to the Set 1 manual cover, overprinted with BOUWDOOZEN (construction sets),
NEDERLANDSCH FABRIKAAT (made in the Netherlands), and the prices of Sets 1 and 2.


The size is 302 x 230 mm. It is printed with spot colors black, gray, red, green and light blue.

DOWNLOAD 150 dpi PDF



Scan courtesy of Leen Kalden






1925 - MOBACO POSTER        

 
This colorful poster is 465 x 633 mm (larger than A2). It mentions the 4 sets available in 1925, which helps to date it. This poster shows that Mobaco was originally marketed as an architectural toy, similar to Meccano being advertised as a mechanical toy.

It is printed with spot colors: black, gray, red, yellow, green, light blue

DOWNLOAD 150 dpi PDF



Original courtesy of Leen Kalden









11 MARCH 1925 - MOBACO AT THE JAARBEURS TRADE FAIR         
ARTICLE IN UTRECHTS NIEUWSBLAD

A "report" about the second day of the 1925 Spring Fair in the Jaarbeurs in Utrecht mentions Mobaco, available at the Bosch Honig stand. Bosch Honig was a toy store in Utrecht.

Click here for the entire Jaarbeurs article.





Image courtesy of CM

Translation:

That's nice, said Joris. We did't know about that before [referring to an item just described], as well as this, he continued, pointing to a

Mobaco construction set,

a most charming toy, which Bosch Honig has had on display for quite some time, and makes boys go crazy.

The Mobaco set is a product of national industry. Mobaco constructions are good in every way and the designs are beautiful in design and drawing, yet leave an unlimited area to the imagination of children.

The material consists of wood and cardboard and houses constructed with it are particularly solid and strong and can be easily moved* without the structure falling apart.

I have three boys myself, said Joris, and I can imagine that such toys give children a lot of pleasure.


*) Note: this may refer to a new type of ground plate that had an extra layer of cardboard at the bottom, closing off the holes, so columns couldn't fall through when lifting up the model. This type of ground plate was discontinued after a year or two.









9 SEPTEMBER 1927 - MOBACO AT THE JAARBEURS TRADE FAIR           ARTICLE IN UTRECHTS NIEUWSBLAD

This article in Utrechts Nieuwsblad about the 1927 Fall Fair in the Jaarbeurs in Utrecht mentions Mobaco.

The article references Set 4, noting that it has 1135 parts, and states that Bosch Honig have the sole distribution rights.

Click here for the entire Jaarbeurs article.




Image courtesy CM







12 SEPTEMBER 1931 - ARTICLE IN ZEISTER COURANT         

T
his article in the Zeister Courant about the 1931 Fall Fair in the Jaarbeurs in Utrecht reports on the stand of van Mouwerik en Bal. It mentions Mobaco, as well as other Moubal products on display, including the VeeGee home cash register, a metal ash tray that can be attached to a window with a suction cup, and semi-finished stamping and extrusion products.




Image courtesy CM






17
SEPTEMBER 1931
- ARTICLE IN UTRECHTS NIEUWSBLAD         


T
his article in Utrechts Nieuwsblad is also about the 1931 Fall Fair in the Jaarbeurs in Utrecht, and reports on the stand of van Mouwerik en Bal. It references the colorful gnomes book by Harmsen van Beek (see below).  This time, there is no mention of Bosch Honig.

Click here for the entire Jaarbeurs article.










THE GNOMES SALES BROCHURES (HET KABOUTERBOEKJE)         

There are three versions of this colorful sales brochure, featuring a family of gnomes ("kabouters" in Dutch) living in a Mobaco world. The illustrations are by artist ter Harmsen van der Beek.

The brochures are undated, but in a 17 September 1931 article about the Jaarbeurs fair in Utrecht (see above), the gnome brochure is mentioned. No such mention is in the 1927 Jaarbeurs article.

The first edition of the brochure announces a new Set Z with new parts, which are also shown in an article in "Natuur en Techniek" in 1931, which indicates that Version 1 might be from 1931 or before.

Interestingly, this would be 3 years before the first price list with a ter Harmsen van der Beek illustration (1934).

Based on the sets mentioned in the brochure, the first version of the gnomes brochure could have been issued as early as 1926, the year that sets 3, 4 and Stations No. 1 and No. 2 were issued. However, the last page of Version 1 mentions that there are 11 sets available. It is unclear whether this includes the "brand new Set Z, in preparation" or Set 000, which is not shown in the book, but it must include Set 2a, so Version 1 must be from the same year or after the introduction of Set 2a. So far, we don't know when exactly Set 2a was introduced, but it was between 1928 and 1931, and most likely in 1931 as all known examples of Set 2a have square windows, which were introduced in 1931.

The description of Set 3 mentions that all models in this booklet are taken from construction manuals. This indicates that the models featured in the Set 1-4 gnomes manual were already available by this time. The description of Set 4 references a "manual for Set 4" which may indicate there was a separate manual that pre-dates the Set 1-4 gnomes manual. This makes sense, as Sets 3 and 4 were introduced in 1926, while the Set 1-4 gnomes manual probably came out after the Set 1+2 art deco manual.
 
My theory is that this gnomes brochure, the Set 1-4 gnomes manual and the Set 00-0-1 gnomes manual were all introduced at the same time, somewhere between 1927 and 1931, and most likely in 1931, the year the gnomes brochure is mentioned in the Jaarbeurs article.

In the Natuur & Techniek article, we see them packing Set 0 art deco manuals, but these pictures were probably taken in the summer of 1931, shortly before the introduction of the gnomes manuals. That same article shows the production of square windows, which would indicate that these gnomes books, which have round windows, are from before 1931. However, preparation of these books will have taken a while, so my guess is that they were still using round windows when ter Harmsen van der Beek was commissioned to make these books in 1930. They decided to move to square windows for a more "modern" look in early 1931, but it was too late to change the artwork.
All this is conjecture.

This also means that from 1926 through 1930, there may have been another manual for Sets 3 and 4, possibly similar in design to the large "village" manual, showing Models 41 through 80, but so far none ha
ve been found.


An important difference between the three brochures is the page with picnicking gnomes. In version 1 (left), it features Set Z. In version 2 (middle), there is a technical drawing of the new Set 000, with a square window, and a flower pot copied from the Set 00 page. Version 3 (right) has an artsy version of Set 000, with a new "door" design:










THE GNOMES SALES BROCHURE (HET KABOUTERBOEKJE) -          
version 1, with Set Z (probably issued in 1931)


This book features sets 00, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and Stations No. 1 and No. 2, and includes a set that was never issued, Set Z. This set included a series of new parts, which are enumerated in the description: a chimney, a stairway, a conservatory, a balcony, a new entry door, a taller gate, a canopy and a flag pole, all in different colors.

                    


These items are also shown in a 1931 article in Natuur & Techniek (see picture below). None of these items were ever taken into production except the flag pole, part 161, and the front door, part 14, but with a different design - see Gnomes Book version 3 below.




BTW, as far as I know, the flag pole was already in production and included in Sets 3 and 4, which were introduced in 1926. The flag pole is featured in just one model, model no. 65, a grand Set 4 building in the Sets 1-4 Gnomes manual.

Train Station no. 1 is drawn incorrectly, the main building is 3 x 4 columns large, not 4 x 4 as shown.

There are also English, German and Spanish versions of this manual.


      232 x 173 mm

      12 pages (incl. covers)

      Colored covers and pages

     
      See pages

      DOWNLOAD PDF











Scans courtesy Leen Kalden




ENGLISH VERSION         


This is the English version of this booklet! It's an exact copy of the Dutch version 1.

The translation of some of the items in the new Set Z is a bit odd:


Dutch description            English description

    conservatory                 closed verandah
      
balcony                         open balcony
     
taller gate                  new high-pile work
      
canopy                            penthouse
      
flag pole                           flag-staff




      232 x 173 mm

      12 pages (incl. covers)

      Colored covers and pages

     
      See pages

      DOWNLOAD PDF











Scans courtesy Henri de Graaf




GERMAN VERSION         


This is the German version of this booklet. It's an exact copy of the Dutch version 1.



      232 x 173 mm

      12 pages (incl. covers)

      Colored covers and pages

     
      See pages

      DOWNLOAD PDF












Original courtesy of Nick Cranendonk







THE GNOMES SALES BROCHURE (HET KABOUTERBOEKJE) -         

version 2, with Set 000 (probably issued in 1932)


This book features the same sets as version 1 above, except Set Z has been replaced with the new Set 000. The same picnickers are featured in the background, and the drawing of the little house is very technical and not in keeping withe the other pages, which suggests it was not done by Harmsen van Beek, but by a Moubal employee.

Note that the window in Set 000 has square upper lights instead of round. This indicated the brochure was prepared as they introduced the square upper windows. The next version of the booklet has all square windows.

Set 000 was introduced in 1932, so this brochure must be from 1932 or later.
 


      232 x 173 mm

      12 pages (incl. covers)

      Colored covers and pages

     
      See pages

      DOWNLOAD PDF












Scans courtesy Leen Kalden







THE GNOMES SALES BROCHURE (HET KABOUTERBOEKJE) -          

version 3, with square windows (probably 1933 or later)

This book features the same sets as version 2: 000, 00, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and Stations No. 1 and No. 2. The house for Set 000 is redrawn to be more in keeping with the other pages.

All windows now have square upper windows.

This booklet features a new version of the door, a gray panel with 4 vertical openings. This part was soon discontinued, as this "door" blocked access to the inside of the house, and thus limited the play value. Only a few sets have been found with this door design.

For the rest, all drawings are the same as version 2.

Assuming this brochure is at least a year later than version 2, it must be from 1933 or later.


      232 x 173 mm

      12 pages (incl. covers)

      Colored covers and pages

     
      See pages

      DOWNLOAD PDF










Scans courtesy Alex Geelhoed







Ads for Mobaco demonstrations         

A good form of marketing are demonstrations. In various ads, Mobaco demonstrations were announced. Here ones found so far by avid Mobaco researcher and contributor Leen Kalden.

It appears they were held primarily in 1931 through 1934.

Warenhuis Van den Borg in Nijmegen, and E. van der Hart & Zoon in Arhnem were particularly active in promoting Mobaco.





Image courtesy Leen Kalden

6 November 1926 - Amersfoortsch Dagblad


Image courtesy Leen Kalden

17 November 1931-
Provinciale Geldersche
en Nijmeegsche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

24 November 1931-
Arnhemsche Courant




Image courtesy Leen Kalden

18 December 1931-
De Gelderlander



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

19 December 1931-
Provinciale Geldersche
 en Nijmeegsche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

22 December 1931-
Provinciale Geldersche
 en Nijmeegsche Courant


Image courtesy Leen Kalden

17 November 1932 -
De Gelderlander


Image courtesy Leen Kalden

17 November 1932 -
Provinciale Geldersche
en Nijmeegsche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

18 November 1932 -
Arnhemsche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

24 October 1933 -
Algemeen Handelsblad


Image courtesy Leen Kalden

The image of the windmill was
Lantain-Thewes' logo and has nothing
to do with the possible demonstration of
a Mobaco windmill prototype.

21 November 1933 -
Bredasche Courant


  
Image courtesy Leen Kalden

9 November 1934 - De Gelderlander
9 November 1934 - Provinciale Geldersche
en Nijmeegsche Courant









Unpriced Mobaco ads - Moubal period (1924 - 1951)    


The primary form of Mobaco advertisement were newspaper ads by local toy stores. Here a smattering of ads that mention Mobaco. Occasionally, Mobaco will be the focal point of the ad, but more often than not, it appears among other toys such as Meccano and toy trains.

Ads with prices are located in the Price Lists page.






Image courtesy Leen Kalden

22 November 1924 -
DelftscheCourant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

29 November 1924 - Provinciale Drentsche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

30 November 1924 - Het nieuws van
den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indie



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

6 November 1925 - Schoonhovensche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

22 November 1926 - Nieuwsblad van het Noorden



Image courtesy CM

27 October 1928 - De Amerongsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

3 November 1928 - De Kaap



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

17 November 1928 - Arnhemsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

24 November 1928 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy Rien ten Bos

1928



Image courtesy CM

3 October 1929 - De Bussumsche Courant


Image courtesy CM

23 November 1929 - De Zeister Courant





Image courtesy CM

Unusual ad, placed in the Catalan edition
of a German newspaper


12 February 1930 - Berliner Tageblatt
Castellana edition



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

This illustration shows a window part that
never existed: two vertical slots with a
round opening above.


April 1930 - De vrouw en haar huis



Image courtesy CM

15 November 1930 - De Bussumsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

27 November 1930 - De Bussumsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

29 November 1930 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

3 December 1930 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

July 1931 - De vrouw en haar huis



Image courtesy CM

25 November 1931 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

26 November 1931 - De Bussumsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

26 November 1932 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

4 November 1933 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

25 November 1933 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

6 September 1934 - De Bussumsche Courant



Image courtesy HONGS

First ad with kids playing, an illustration by
artist ter Harmsen van der Beek


2 November 1934 - De Indische Courant



Image courtesy CM

24 November 1934 - De Bussumsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

28 November 1934 - De Zeister Courant


Image courtesy Leen Kalden

1934 (issue no. 18) - De revue der sporten/
Sport in beeld





Image courtesy Leen Kalden

1 June 1935 - Maandblad de Kroniek



 Image courtesy of Leen Kalden

This ad shows the model of Train Station no. 2 and a train setup, probably 0 gauge.
Note that the train and the cars are too small in relation to the building, just compare the size of the doors.
Moubal Mobaco models are appr. 1:30 scale, appropriate for 1 gauge trains, which are 1:32.

3 December 1935 - Meppeler Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

9 December 1935 Sport in beeld



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

This ad mentions the Wind Mill Sets

27 November 1936- Leeuwarder Nieuwsblad


Image courtesy CM

28 November 1936 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

16 October 1937 - Eilanden Nieuws



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

15 November 1937 - Bredasche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

11 November 1938 - De nieuwe Koerier


Image courtesy CM

23 November 1939 - De Bussumsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

23 October 1940 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

25 October 1940 - Stichtsch Nieuws en Handelsblad


Image courtesy CM

30 October 1940 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

The boys have been cut out of the drawing!
See detail below-left

20 November 1940 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

20 November 1940 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy CM

27 November 1940 - De Zeister Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

First post-war ad for the "original Mobaco sets"

27 February 1948 - Nieuwsblad voor Gorinchem


Image courtesy CM

19 November 1948 - Stichtse Courant




Image courtesy CM

10 December 1948 - Stichtse Courant




Image courtesy Leen Kalden

4 November 1949 - De Gooi- en Eemlander



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

The image is of a pre-war set

25 November 1949 - Haarlems Dagblad



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

The ad mentions 11 sets. These must be the original Moubal sets, indicating that in 1951 you could still get the pre-war sets

16 November 1951 - Libelle










VAN DEN BOSCH, ZEIST         


Mobaco was first sold at the store of Firma G. van den Bosch, Slotlaan 18 in Zeist - see the 1924 ad on Sets page.

Here a picture of the store from a 1932 advertisement:


Image courtesy of Leen Kalden - from Gids van Zeist en de Stichtsche Lustwarande, 1932







BOSCH HONIG, UTRECHT         

NV Bosch Honig in Utrecht had a special relationship with Moubal. They were one of the first sales outlets of Mobaco, and for a while were its sole distributor.

I don't have much information on them, here what I found.

In 1929, their store was located at Korte Jansstraat 1 & 1-bis in Utrecht, now a eyeware store. By 1927 they had moved to Domstraat 6, Utrecht.

Bosch Honig had a stand at the Jaarbeurs fair in Utrecht in Spring 1925, see newspaper clipping above. They may also have been present at the fair in Fall 1927, but the clipping isn't clear whether it was van Mouwerik & Bal or Bosch Honig who had a stand.

They sold Mobaco in 1925 (article Jaarbeurs), and it appears they were the sole distributors of Mobaco in 1926 (Undated Price List #1), 1927 (article Jaarbeurs) and through the September 1931, according to advertisements in De Groene Amsterdammer and De Joodsche jeugdkrant Betsalel - see below.



Image courtesy Leen Kalden



Here a Bosch Honig envelope from 1929, featuring a large stamp of Model no. 76 (as shown on the back of the 1924 Set 2 manual), which was stamped over the envelope seal. Their address is Korte Jansstraat 1 & 1-bis, Utrecht.



   
Scans courtesy Leen Kalden



This ad appeared pretty much unchanged every two weeks in De Groene Amsterdammer from 9 January 1926 through 22 December 1928, then after a year hiatus again from 28 December 1929 through 27 December 1930. The ads mention that N.V. Bosch Honig are the sole agent for the Netherlands ("alleenverkoop"). The illustration is building #34 from Set 2. Address is Domstraat 6 in Utrecht:

   
De Groene Amsterdammer, 22 January 1927                                    De Groene Amsterdammer, 9 June 1928



This ad appeared unchanged every month in De Joodsche jeugdkrant Betsalel from April 1928 through July 1929, then in October and November 1929. In 1930 the ad appeared in July, October and December. In 1931, the ad appeared in March, April, August and September. All ads mention that N.V. Bosch Honig are the sole agent for the Netherlands ("alleenverkoop"). The illustration is building #52 from Set 3:

  
De Joodsche jeugdkrant Betsalel, 4 April 1928                                          De Joodsche jeugdkrant Betsalel, 24 September 1931









MARKETING IN THE JUMBO PERIOD (1949 - 1961)





Toy catalogs         


After the war, there was a shortage of everything. It took a while for industry to get going again, and toys were a low priority.

Hausemann & Hötte started selling Mobaco in 1949 under the Jumbo brand, and the initial ABC series appears prominently in their 1949 catalog "Het Speelgoedboek". Several of the Hausemann & Hötte catalogs are shown
on the Price Lists page.

Mobaco is last featured in the 1961-1962 Jumbo catalog. The toy simply was too dated and new "modern" toys such as Lego were on children's minds. Thus ended Mobaco's 38 year history, from the Fall of 1924 through the Summer of 1962...






Hausemann & Hötte display at the 1955 Jaarbeurs       
trade
fair



Here two photo's of Hausemann & Hötte's booth, displaying their Jumbo products, including a big Mobaco banner, a large Mobaco building, and a dealer's chest.

Outside view, with their name just visible in the top-left corner of the photo. The walls are lined with other Jumbo products such as Electro:





Inside view, with a dealer chest open on the left side. There is some imaginative use of parts in the model, including using ground plates for the intermediate floors, and a bit of glue here and there to keep parts in place that would otherwise fall to the ground:


Images courtesy of Leen Kalden




Unpriced Mobaco ads - Jumbo period (1949 - 1961)     

In addition to toy catalogs, Hausemann & Hötte typically placed quarter-page ads in November in magazines such as Libelle.

But toy stores still put out ads with Mobaco, although it often has no prominence. Below a smattering of ads collected from various (mostly on-line) newspapers.

Firma Den Uijl was very active in 1951, for the rest it's surprising how little there really is. A notable exception is this large newspaper ad from November 1958 in Algemeen Handelsblad. I suspect interest was starting to wane, and Hausemann & Hötte gave it their best shot for the Sinterklaas/Christmas season:



Image courtesy CM






source: marktplaats.nl

1950? - magazine unknown



Image courtesy CM

10 July 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

14 July 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

7 August 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

17 August 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

5 September 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

7 September 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

27 September 1951 -  Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

24 October 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

26 October 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

2 November 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

9 November 1951 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

The ad mentions 11 sets. These must be the original Moubal sets, indicating that in 1951
you could still get the pre-war sets.
The above
ads could either be for Moubal
sets or for the Jumbo version.


16 November 1951 - Libelle




Image courtesy CM

13 March 1952 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

8 April 1952 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad


Image courtesy CM

7 November 1952 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

18 November 1952 - Stichtsche Courant



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

This ad refers to "Dorpen en Steden",
which are the Jumbo sets.


14 November 1953 - IJmuider Courant



Image courtesy CM

27 November 1953 - De Kaap



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

6 November 1954 - De Spiegel



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

"Request our free toy folder no. 1"

1955 - magazine unknown



Image courtesy Leen Kalden

"Request our free toy folder no. 2"

24 March 1956 - K.I.



Image courtesy CM

30 November 1956 - Stichtsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

30 November 1957 - Stichtsche Courant



Image courtesy CM

28 November 1958 - Utrechts Nieuwsblad



Image courtesy CM

18 March 1960 - Stichtsche Courant







Back to top